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Cops arrest man accused of leaving gun on bus

Man arrested in downtown Halifax after driver finds firearm on bus
Alison Auld, The Canadian Press

HALIFAX - Police arrested a man in Halifax and recovered a firearm on a public bus Thursday, hours after receiving a report of someone walking along a downtown street with what appeared to be a rifle wrapped in black fabric.

Const. Pierre Bourdages of Halifax Regional Police said a driver found a firearm on his bus at about 11 a.m., more than two hours after the initial sighting of someone allegedly concealing a weapon nearby.

No uniforms in public, soldiers told

Military to tone down the wearing of uniforms in public following two attacks
The Canadian Press

OTTAWA - Members of the Canadian military in the Ottawa area have been told stop wearing their uniforms in public, with the exception of going back and forth to work.

While it has not been made a general order, a guidance directive was issued today after a reservist guarding the National War Memorial was shot and killed by a rifle-toting gunman who later stormed Parliament Hill and died in a gunfight inside the Centre Block.

Inuit group wants Nunavut justice reforms

Inuit group wants justice reforms to reflect high rates of abuse in Nunavut
Bob Weber, The Canadian Press

Nunavut's "cradle-to-prison" justice system must be reformed to reflect the high number of people in the territory who have been victims of physical and sexual violence, an Inuit land-claim group said Thursday.

"There are few safety nets in place to catch people who are experiencing adversity," said a report from Nunavut Tunngavik Inc.

"Nunavut’s criminal justice system is often the first stop in a cradle-to-prison pipeline in which people struggling with trauma, mental health disorders or prenatal alcohol exposure are most vulnerable to incarceration."

Snowden chronicler sees tighter security in Canada

Journalist who spotlighted Snowden leaks predicts security crackdown in Canada
Nelson Wyatt, The Canadian Press

MONTREAL - Canadians should expect sweeping security and surveillance measures following attacks against the military in Quebec and Ottawa, says the man who helped expose wide-ranging government monitoring of citizens in the United States.

"I will be shocked if the events of this week don't result in far greater secrecy powers and far greater surveillance powers than existed previously," Glenn Greenwald told The Canadian Press on Thursday.

Ban placed on review of murder conviction

Judge places publication ban on murder conviction assessment in Nova Scotia case
Michael Tutton, The Canadian Press

HALIFAX - A judge granted a publication ban Thursday on a preliminary assessment of the case of a Nova Scotia man whose murder conviction may have been the result of a miscarriage of justice.

The lawyers for Glen Eugene Assoun and the federal Justice Department argued last week against allowing the public to hear or see details from the initial federal review of Assoun's second-degree murder conviction.

The Justice Department said the recently completed assessment shows there may have been a miscarriage of justice and a more in-depth investigation has been launched.

Tighter security at New Brunswick army base

Tighter security imposed at New Brunswick army base following Ottawa shooting
The Canadian Press

OROMOCTO, N.B. - Tighter security measures have been imposed at 5th Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown in New Brunswick as a result of recent violent acts against Canadian Forces members in Quebec and Ontario.

Capt. Jamie Donovan, a spokesman for the army base, said Thursday military police are checking the IDs of everyone entering the grounds in Oromocto.

That resulted in long lineups and staff were instructed to report at staggered times, depending on their duties.

Lawyer, passersby go to fallen soldier's aid

'You are so loved': Ottawa lawyer describes trying to save Cpl. Nathan Cirillo
Laura Eggertson, The Canadian Press

OTTAWA - Lawyer Barbara Winters was headed to a meeting Wednesday near her office at the Canada Revenue Agency when she passed the National War Memorial, stopping to snap a few pictures of the two honour guards standing soberly at attention.

Moments later, after passing by a Canada Post office at the corner of Elgin and Sparks streets, she heard four shots. For Winters, a former member of the Canadian Forces Naval Reserve, the sounds were unmistakable.

Magnotta jury views more video and photos

Magnotta jury watches original images used to create so-called murder video
Sidhartha Banerjee, The Canadian Press

CAUTION: GRAPHIC CONTENT MAY DISTURB SOME READERS

MONTREAL — Jurors at Luka Rocco Magnotta's murder trial saw video clips on Thursday that show the accused holding an oscillating saw as he stands over a man who is sleeping.

Video and stills of the mystery man, who has never been identified by Montreal police, were shot on May 19, 2012, less than a week before Jun Lin's dismemberment and desecration in Magnotta's apartment.

Imam says new converts need to be checked out

Prominent Muslim cleric says imams need to vet new Islamic converts
Bill Graveland, The Canadian Press

CALGARY - A prominent Muslim cleric says he intends to reach out to other imams to make sure that new converts to Islam are watched closely for signs of radical beliefs.

While authorities have said little about the motives for this week's attacks on soldiers in Ottawa and Quebec, Imam Syed Soharwardy of Calgary says he is concerned about media reports that the two perpetrators were recent converts to Islam.

Canadian prisons overcrowded: group

Canadian prisons becoming 'bloated human warehouses:' advocacy group
Clare Clancy, The Canadian Press

REGINA - An advocacy group that says Canada's prisons are becoming "bloated human warehouses" has released its own ideas on how to address overcrowding.

"We're not in a position to implement any of these things, but we are certainly in a position to advocate and point out some very concrete, common-sense ideas that would ultimately lead to greater public safety and fix a broken system," said Shaun Dyer, a spokesman for the John Howard Society of Canada in Saskatchewan.

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